Grad Students

How to find and work with a linguist

The Fieldwork Working Group has published the first in a series of videos aimed at connecting language communities with pertinent information about working with linguistics. The first video features information about how to find and work with a linguist as well as a list of the types of projects and tasks linguists can support language communities with. The Fieldwork Working Group is also taking suggestions for topics to discuss in future videos to be added to the series. The Fieldwork Working Group is headed by Natalie Weber. A link to the first video in the series is available below.

Sigríður Sæunn publishes a paper in Íslenskt mál og almenn málfræði [Icelandic language and general linguistics]

Sigríður Sæunn Sigurðardóttir published a paper entitled, “’Haf góðan dag’ Um uppkomu nýrrar kveðju út frá hugmyndum um talgjörðir” [‘Have a nice day’ The emergence of a new leave-taking term in Icelandic in the light of Speech Act Theory] in Íslenskt mál og almenn málfræði 41.-42The paper is on the leave-taking term Hafðu góðan dag (‘Have a nice day (ACC)’), which has become prominent in Modern Icelandic but has been prescriptively deemed “improper Icelandic” due to its being influenced by English Have

Claire Bowern and Sarah Babinski present at The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC)

Sarah Babinski and Claire Bowern both presented at The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships, which was hosted virtually by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa on March 4-7, 2021.

Jeremy Johns interviewed by Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity & Transnational Migration

Jeremy Johns is recently interviewed by the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity & Transnational Migration, as a RITM Graduate Fellow.

As described by the Yale Center for the Study of Race, Indigeneity & Transnational Migration, in order to attract the best graduate students to Yale and to support their work, the Center designates a select number of incoming doctoral students annually as RITM Graduate Fellows. These Fellows are nominated by their departments upon admission and are selected by an RITM committee.

Several Yale linguists present at AMP 2020

Several phonologists are presenting at the Annual Meeting on Phonology (AMP) 2020.

Jason Shaw is presenting a paper co-authored with Sejin Oh (Yale-affiliated, at Haskins), Alexei Kochetov & Karthik Durvasula: “Distinguishing complex segments from consonant clusters using gestural coordination

There are also three posters:

Sarah Babinski: “Intrinsic f0 and sound change: Evidence from Australian languages”,

Sarah Babinski presents work at virtual LabPhon17 Conference

PhD Candidate Sarah Babinski presented a talk titled “Lexical stress: Phonetic variation under phonological stability in Australian languages,” at LabPhon17, the biennial conference of the Association for Laboratory Phonology, which was held virtually from July 6-8 2020. In this talk, she presented preliminary results from her dissertation research on the comparative phonetics of stress marking across Australian languages.

Matt Tyler defends dissertation

On Thursday, July 23rd, Matt Tyler successfully defended his PhD dissertation. The defense, which was held virtually on Zoom, presented Matt’s dissertation entitled Argument Structure and Argument-Marking in Choctaw, supervised by Jim Wood. The committee members were Raffaella Zanuttini, Bob Frank, and Aaron Broadwell. Congratulations, Matt!

Larry Horn and Martín Fuchs publish chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Negation

Professor Emeritus Larry Horn published two chapters in The Oxford Handbook of Negation (link to online version). In “Negation and Opposition: Contradiction and contrariety in logic and language”, he addresses the complications that arise from equating Aristotle’s semantic category of contradictory opposition with the syntactic category of sentence (vs. constituent) negation.

Sigríður Sæunn Sigurðardóttir presents a talk at DGFS

Sirrý Sigurðardóttir gave a talk at a workshop during the DGfS (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sprachwissenschaft) last week. Sirrý’s talk, entitled “The Anti-Occam’s Razor: The distinction between pronouns and expletives in Icelandic” (link to abstract), was presented at the workshop “Theoretical approaches to grammatical (non-)identity in synchrony and diachrony.”

Parker Brody publishes in Journal of Historical Linguistics

Parker Brody has published an article in the most recent issue of Journal of Historical Linguistics.  “Morphological exceptionality and pathways of change” explores the notion of analyzing cross-linguistically uncommon morphosyntactic structures in terms of their historical development. What may seem extraordinary in the synchronic snapshot of a language can often be clearly accounted for through diachronic considerations.

Matt Tyler and Jim Wood publish in Linguistic Variation

Matthew Tyler and Jim Wood have published an article in the most recent issue of Linguistic Variation. The article is entitled “Microvariation in the ‘have yet to’ construction”, and reports on results from the research of the Yale Grammatical Diversity project. The ‘have yet to’ construction refers to sentences like ‘I have yet to visit my grandmother’, meaning ‘I have not visited my grandmother yet’.

Martín Fuchs teaches a course on meaning change at the Buenos Aires Summer School in Linguistics

During the first week of February 2020, Martín Fuchs taught a course on meaning change and its cognitive and communicative underpinnings at the Buenos Aires Linguistics Summer School. The goal of the course was to introduce graduate students to theories of semantic change that aim at uncovering the forces that produce the regularities that are observed in this domain.

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