Faculty

Jim Wood gave an invited talk on nominalizations

Jim Wood gave an invited talk at JENom 9 “The 9th Workshop on Nominalizations,” which was held online June 17–18. This workshop brought together a wide variety of theoretical perspectives and research methodologies on nominalizations, and focused on a number languages including English, French, Italian, Spanish, Polish, Slovenian, Swedish, Turkish, Basque, Old English, Mandarin, Cantonese, and Kwa languages.

Jason Shaw gave an invited talk at LMU Munich

Jason Shaw gave an invited talk at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. The talk, entitled “Tone as gesture: space, time, perception and change” featured recent work in the Yale phonetics lab on lexical tone, including graduate student projects by Chris Geissler and Andy Zhang. The talk was a part of LMU’s MAMPF (Methods and approaches of modern phonetic research) series (link to talk series). Link to abstract.

Award: Roger Shuy Best Paper in American Speech for 2020 for Article Co-Authored by Jim Wood, Raffaella Zanuttini, Larry Horn, and Jason Zentz

The “Roger Shuy Best Paper of 2020” prize for the journal American Speech was awarded to an article (“Dative Country: Markedness and Geographical Variation in Southern Dative Constructions”) co-authored by four members of the Yale Linguistics Department: Jim Wood, Raffaella Zanuttini, Larry Horn and Jason Zentz.

Claire Bowern and Sarah Babinski present at The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC)

Sarah Babinski and Claire Bowern both presented at The 7th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC): Recognizing Relationships, which was hosted virtually by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa on March 4-7, 2021.

Veneeta Dayal will give a colloquium talk on "Puzzles from the Interrogative Left Periphery" at CUNY Graduate Center on March 11, 2021

The talk presents several inter-related puzzles:
 
Puzzle 1: Why does declarative syntax plus rising intonation lead to a biased question in some languages (English) but is ambiguous between a neutral and a biased interpretation in others (Hindi-Urdu)?
 
Puzzle 2: Why can polar questions be mono-clausal as matrix questions in every(?) language but not in at least some embedded positions in some languages (Hindi-Urdu)?
 

Claire Bowern publishes in Diachronica

Claire Bowern is an author, headed by Jayden Macklin-Cordes and Erich Round (Ling PhD 2009) of a new study on phylogenetic signal in phonotactics. The paper uses data from Pama-Nyungan (Australian) languages to track the extent to which phoneme inventory characteristics (phoneme presence/absence, unigram and bigram frequency) show phylogenetic signal. This is relevant for claims that Australian languages do not show sound change. The paper is open access and supplementary materials are available.

Jason Shaw publishes in Language

Jason Shaw co-authored a paper published in Language. The paper, entitled “Phonological contrast and phonetic variation: The case of velars in Iwaidja”, presents a field-based ultrasound and acoustic study of Iwaidja, an endanged Australian Aboriginal language. This study reveals how lenition that is both phonetically gradient and variable across speakers and words can give the illusion of a contextually restricted phonemic contrast.

Claire Bowern presents at American Philosophical Society

Claire Bowern presented work at the American Philosophical Society’s 2020 Native American Scholars Initiative conference: Relationships, Reciprocity, and Responsibilities: Indigenous Studies in Archives and Beyond. Co-presenting with Australian colleagues George Hayden, Denise Smith-Ali and Sue Hanson, they discussed the Yale grammar bootcamps and ways of making long-distance collaborations work to augment community-based local language reclamation efforts.

Several Yale linguists present at AMP 2020

Several phonologists are presenting at the Annual Meeting on Phonology (AMP) 2020.

Jason Shaw is presenting a paper co-authored with Sejin Oh (Yale-affiliated, at Haskins), Alexei Kochetov & Karthik Durvasula: “Distinguishing complex segments from consonant clusters using gestural coordination

There are also three posters:

Sarah Babinski: “Intrinsic f0 and sound change: Evidence from Australian languages”,

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