Maria Piñango

Courses

Term: Fall 2021

LING 217/617 - Language and Mind

The structure of linguistic knowledge and how it is used during communication. The principles that guide the acquisition of this system by children learning their first language, by children learning language in unusual circumstances (heritage speakers, sign languages) and adults learning a second language, bilingual speakers. The processing of language in real-time. Psychological traits that impact language learning and language use. 

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30p-3:45p

LING 372/772 - Meaning, Concepts, and Words

A cognitive approach to the structure of meaning from the perspetive of the language system. The brain’s finite collection of stored concepts, which are combined and recombined via predetermined principles. The system of associating combinations of concepts with combinations of words and sentences to produce an unlimited number of novel thoughts.

Prerequisite: at least one course in linguistics, psychology, or cognitive science.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Wednesday, 9:25 - 11:15a
Term: Spring 2022

LING 231/631 - Neurolinguistics

The study of language as a cognitive neuroscience. The interaction between linguistic theory and neurological evidence from brain damage, degenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease), mental illness (e.g., schizophrenia), neuroimaging, and neurophysiology. The connection of language as a neurocognitive system to other systems such as memory and music.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 2:30 - 3:45p

LING 475/875 - Linguistics Meaning and CS

The meaning of a word or sentence is something in the human mind that has specific properties: it can be expressed (written/signed/spoken forms); it can be combined with other meanings; its expression is not language dependent; it connects with the world; it serves as a vehicle for inference; and it is hidden from awareness. The course explores these properties in some detail and, in the process, provides the students with technical vocabulary and analytical tools to further investigate them. The course is thus intended for those students interested in undertaking a research project on the structure of meaning. the nature of lexico-conceptual structure, that is, the structure of concepts which we refer to as “word meanings”, and how they may be combined through linguistic and non-linguistic means. Its ultimate objective is to bridge models of conceptual structure and models of linguistic semantic composition, identify their respective strengths and weaknesses and explore some of the fundamental questions that any theory of linguistic meaning composition must answer. Evidence discussed will emerge from naturalistic, introspectional, and experimental methodologies.

Prerequisites: LING 110, CGSC 110, LING 217, or LING 263.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30 - 3:45p