Jason Shaw

Courses

Term: Fall 2021

LING 220/620 - General Phonetics

Phonetics is the study of the physical aspects of speech, including the movement of the articulatory organs and the resulting acoustic signal. Students will learn to recognize, transcribe, and produce the sounds of the world’s languages. They will learn methods for visualization and analysis of speech acoustics and articulatory kinematics. The course will also explore connections between phonetics and other aspects of language, including phonology, cross-linguistic typology, and sound change, and provide introductions to speech perception and sociophonetics. 

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday 1pm - 2:15pm

LING 332/732 - Speech Planning and Production

How do the cognitive processes involved in speech production relate to linguistic structure, including the morphological and phonological structure of words? This seminar engages with this question by bringing together primary readings on (1) neurocognitive models of speech motor control and (2) language-specific phonetic patterns, as they relate to morphological and phonological structure.

Prerequisite: LING 220, LING 235, LING 236, LING 238, or permission of instructor.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Tuesdday, 9:25 - 11:15a
Term: Spring 2022

LING 236/636 - Articulatory Phonology

Study of experimental methods to record articulatory movements using electromagnetic articulography and/or ultrasound technologies and analytical approaches for relating articulatory movements to phonological structure. Hands-on training in laboratory techniques are paired with discussion of related experimental and theoretical research.

Prerequisites: LING 220 and LING 232 or permission of instructor.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Tuesday 9:25 - 11:15a

LING 238/638 - Encoding speech in Minds and Machines

This class introduces analytical tools that support quantitative reasoning about speech. Methods for encoding speech in computer applications are considered alongside theories of how speech is represented in human minds. The purpose in examining these two areas together is to explore the degree to which theories of the mental representation of speech can inform smart computer applications and the degree to which machine learning techniques can advance the study of the human mind. Topics include computational modelling of speech movements, the resulting speech signal, human speech perception behavior, as well as relevant computational tools for signal processing, feature extraction, and machine learning. No prior experience with Matlab or R is required but some general familiarity with programming is required.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00 - 2:15p