Kenneth Pugh

Courses

Term: Fall 2021

LING 233/633 - The Literate Brain and Mind

The development of fluent reading and writing skills in children is essential for achieving success in the modern world, yet significant numbers of people from all languages and cultures fail to obtain adequate literacy outcomes. This course examines: 1) the genetic neurobiological and cognitive foundations of reading and writing, 2) how learning to read both depends upon and changes oral language systems in the brain, 3) how insights from cognitive neuroscience inform our understanding of teaching and remediation of language and literacy disorders, and 4) how all of this is both similar and dissimilar across contrastive written languages and diverse cultures. Students acquire familiarity with multiple brain imaging tools and what we need to do to deliver on the promise of neuroscience in education.

LING 110 or CGSC 110 is recommended, but not required.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Fall 2021
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday 9a - 10:15a
Term: Spring 2022

LING 218 - Literacy in the Global Context

Access to literate language experience is critically important for political, social, and economic empowerment as well as for many other tangible “quality of life” outcomes. However, despite the obvious social justice implications of literacy, rates remain unacceptably low in most countries, especially in marginalized under-resourced communities. Scientific research on the neurocognitive foundations of fluent reading and writing has expanded considerably in recent years, and a growing body of research also points to how under-resourced environments can put neurocognitive outcomes at risk. Despite this progress, there remain significant academic, political, cultural, and economic factors barriers that can prevent effective translation from “research to classroom (or clinic)”, and these difficulties are amplified for under-resourced communities and vulnerable populations globally. We explore these topics with a special focus on diverse populations including language minority and indigenous communities, children at risk from early exposure to stress and violence, and neuro-diverse children (e.g., sensory loss, language disorders). We also examine the promise (and potential pitfalls) of innovative programs that leverage tools from artificial intelligence (and general education technology) in an attempt to expand global literacy access.

LING 110 or CGSC 110 recommended but not required.

1 credit for Yale College students

Term: Spring 2022
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:00 - 10:15p